bee

  • Special Recognition Art Award 2020

    “The Healing Power of Art” exhibition 2020 sponsored by The Healing Power of ART & ARTISTS

     

    This award is for a work of art, in any medium and style, that most powerfully conveys the importance of protecting and saving wildlife and wild places. 

     

      

    The ForMotherNature.com Special Recognition Award is presented to Diane Morgan for her painting 'Liquid Sunshine'. 

     

    “The painting 'Liquid Sunshine' is special. Besides being beautiful, it brings me in so close to this bee, busy living its life and doing what it does, that I feel a personal connection. I cannot imagine someone looking at this painting and then going home and spraying toxic chemicals in their own yard and garden. ”   

          – Award presenter Cathy Berman, Founder of ForMotherNature.com

     

    • Joshua Tree Bee
    • Trumpet Taster
    • Cactus Bee
    • Good Ol' Poppy Top
    • This Girl is on Fire
    • Licking Roses
    • Jumble Bee
    • Red Hollyhock Bee
    • More Than Meets the Eye
    • Thistle Bee
    • I Love Bees
    • Sippy Cup
    • Love in the Afternoon
    • She's a Little Flighty
    • Laguna Bee
    Previous Next

    The beauty of bees as painted in oil and in watercolor by Diane Morgan.

     

    Diane uses paintings to turn our eyes and our hearts to the bees. She portrays bees in the midst of life, helping us see them in a more intimate way. Visit Diane's website to learn more about her and her paintings.

     

    My interview with Diane:

    FMN: How is it that you came to focus on bees?

    Diane:

    At first just wanting to capture flower images to paint I began shooting roses late on a summer's day. A bee happened along and I happily discovered that it added great interest to the shot. I was intrigued by the variety of colors and shapes of the bees and began shooting more and researching them. I was appalled to learn that one-third of the bee colonies were dying and that one-third of the food we eat needs bees for pollination.

    If the bees continue to die at the current rate, there will be no bees in 25 years. In 1980 there were 4.5 millions hives. Now there are only 2.9 million.

     

    FMN: What do you hope will come from focusing on bees?

    Diane:

    I paint bees to help save bees....to bring attention to the colony collapse crisis.

    I want to help make the bee crisis a prominent issue, get more people involved to solve the problem. Without bees we will lose many of our food crops. There is a city in China that has already lost all of its bees.  The people there hand pollinate their pear trees to keep their orchards producing. The younger generation is not interested and is leaving the area for the big city. Soon there will be no fruit in this town. It is the main livelihood for the residents. I hope my work can help raise awareness about this important issue.

     

    FMN: How do you go about creating your bee paintings?

    Diane:

    I've been painting bee portraits for quite some time now in watercolor and oil. I photograph bees as often as I can find them, which isn't always easy. I like to show the world as a bee sees it. Give a close up view of them at work to bring attention to the important service they provide to the world. Bees know what they need to do and work together to be successful. I want my paintings to shine a light on them and show their beauty and importance to the world.

     

    FMN: What actions would you like people to take to help bees?

    Diane:

    I want people to take the time to learn about the importance of bees and what they can do to help save them. Many simple things can make a difference. Stop using pesticides. Plant flowers and vegetables to give them food sources. Many cities are now allowing gardens in front yards instead of lawns. Wildflowers along freeways can help. I'm originally from Detroit and was pleased to discover Bees in the D, a Detroit non-profit that has made great strides in showcasing the importance of bees to the environment. They have established an incredible number of roof top hives in and around the Detroit area and Canada. They take their passion for teaching to organize and host community events like honey harvests, educational classes on the basics of beekeeping, interactive children's learning events, and speaking engagements about honey bees, pollinators, and gardening. The local honey from their beehives has been featured at local bars and restaurants. They are getting the community involved in saving bees and increasing bee populations. I donate a percentage of my sales to help them spread the word and expand their operations. I hope others will do the same.  BeesintheD.com

    Or, help whatever organizations you have in your own city that are working to help save bees.